Signs of teen dating abuse

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At worst, we’re remembering the teen who retired Ohio teacher Deloris Rome Hudson will never forget: The one strangled to death by her boyfriend, one month before her high school graduation. And that can happen from the youngest grades on up, when we help students understand what a healthy relationship looks like, and know that they deserve that instead.Today’s educators need to be alert to the signs of teen dating abuse. Learning how to develop and maintain positive relationships is part of the social and emotional learning that keeps us all safe and happy—and leads to academic success.When children understand what a healthy relationship is, they are less likely to accept dating violence and are more likely to have positive attitudes toward gender equality, according to a recent study.Healthy parent-child relationships also lead to more satisfaction in romantic relationships.Get Involved with That’s Not Cool Throughout this month, That’s Not Cool – in partnership with Love Is Respect and Break the Cycle – will be hosting numerous activities (here’s a calendar) for you and the teens in your life to raise awareness.Check out That’s Not Cool on Facebook and Twitter, along with following the hashtag #teen DVmonth, to stay in the loop. But when the smartphone is constantly buzzing with messages from a significant other, it could be a sign of dating violence.The best solution is prevention, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). They often have an explosive temper, are jealous, put their partner down, isolate their date from friends and families, make false accusations, have mood swings, seem possessive or bossy, and will pressure their date to do things against his or her will.

adolescents say they’ve experienced some kind of abuse—physical, sexual, emotional, or verbal—in their romantic relationships, and one out of 10 have been purposefully hit, slapped, or physically hurt by their boyfriend or girlfriend, according to data collected by Break the Cycle and its youth-oriented project, .The importance of this issue is why dozens of NEA members participated in a workshop, led by Sarah Colomé of Break the Cycle, at the NEA Joint Conference on Concerns of Women and Minorities last year.“You have this unique and powerful connection to students that not a lot of other adults do,” Colomé says.They have a greater risk of becoming involved in an abusive act and traumatized in their own relationships, according to the AAP.Parents can play a key role in prevention by being a positive role model.

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